Manual Europe before Rome: A Site-by-Site Tour of the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Ages

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Europe Before Rome: A Site-by-Site Tour of the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Ages. Front Cover · T. Douglas Price. OUP USA, Feb 28, - History - pages.
Table of contents

Europe Before Rome begins with a history lesson on early hominids leading up to t T.

Britain BC: Francis Pryor on Britain's best Bronze Age heritage sites to visit

Europe Before Rome begins with a history lesson on early hominids leading up to the prehistoric period and into the stone age. Price uses a number of sites for specific evidence, explaining some of the importance of these sites, but never going into too much detail. Ultimately, Europe Before Rome is more of a text book on these many different sites. Price reveals the important discoveries of many of the sites, but not really in any detail on what affect these artifacts have had on history and their importance. For more reviews, check out the BookBanter site.

This was the 'text book' used by my pre-history class a few semesters ago. I loved it! I found myself reading more than what was assigned and looking up a ton of side information. I enjoyed the way the book was written, organized, and the information and pictures that were included for each site.


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Jan 13, Hugolane rated it really liked it. Very informative book. Definitely filled up some holes in my understanding of what was going on in Europe before Rome. The site by site tour with chronology was easy to follow.


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  5. I was sorry, however, that he chose to exclude Ukraine from the survey apart from a brief mention here or there, and a one page summary on the Scythians. In particular, would have liked to have learned more about the mammoth bone houses that have been uncovered in Ukraine. Also would have liked to have gotten Price's take Very informative book.

    Jun 20, Patrick Carpenter rated it it was amazing Shelves: history. This book was much more than the tagline "A site-by-site tour Each period is prefaced by an archaeological and anthropological introduction and capped by a "thoughts" section which ties all of the organic remnants and potherds together into a story of human cultural developments.

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    Further, it is more than a "these are the steps leading to Rome as a culmination of everything before" sort of history worship: the author celebrates the human achievement of each culture in its place in t This book was much more than the tagline "A site-by-site tour Further, it is more than a "these are the steps leading to Rome as a culmination of everything before" sort of history worship: the author celebrates the human achievement of each culture in its place in time.

    I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in prehistory and the story of Europe before and slightly contemporaneous with Greece and Rome. Dec 15, Andrew Davis rated it really liked it Shelves: history. A very comprehensive, richly illustrated review of the latest knowledge of the human prehistory in Europe from the earliest times of around 1. Notes: One of the many species of apes in Africa, six to seven million years ago, began to walk constantly on two feet, as the climate warmed and dried and forests shrank and grasslands expanded.

    Some of their descendants turned into the earliest members of the genus Homo habilis around 2. These individuals arrived in Europe by at least 1. The evidence from Atapuerca, Spain and other sites indicates that they were meat eaters, and sometimes cannibalistic, using handaxe stone tools. By , years ago antecessor evolved in to heidelbergensis and humans were becoming better hunters. Neanderthals take over the line of human ancestry in Europe after , years ago and hold the stage there until the arrival of modern humans around 40, years ago.

    The earliest controlled use of fire in Europe dates to about , years ago, when constructed fireplaces began to appear in Germany. The homo sapiens brought new hunting equipment, such as the spear-thrower and the bow and arrow. They domesticated dogs and shaped new materials such as bone, wood, shell and ivory into more complex tools.

    Ancient Worlds - The Age of Iron ep.2

    By 30, years ago, almost all the Neanderthals were extinct. A few refuge populations appear to have hung on in southern Iberia until perhaps 25, years ago. Some 10, years ago the ice sheets retreated. Before then, during the Last Glacial Maximum the sea levels were as much as metres below present, with an area called Doggerland connecting Britain with Belgium, Netherlands and Denmark, of the size of the state of California. Britain was cut off from the continent around 6, BC, with Doggerland becoming an island and eventually submerging after 5, BC.

    Between 7, and 4, BC the agriculture gets introduced in the southeast corner of Europe.

    Europe before Rome by T. Douglas Price (ebook)

    Small farming villages began to appear in Greece after 7, BC. By 4, BC, small farming villages had reached Britain and Scandinavia. Bronze arrived in Europe after 3, BC. The Aegean area was the centre of this development. The Etruscans were on the rise in Italy The construction and elaboration of Stonehenge occurred between 3, and 1, BC.

    Around 1, BC the iron age arrived. It started in Turkey shortly before 2, BC. The Biskupin site was developed around BC and was occupied by years. May 28, Jennifer Vibbert rated it liked it. Great detail to western and Central European sites. But isn't there an Eastern Europe? No mention of the Corded Ware Culture pan horizon. How can a book on European prehistory leave this out? Jennifer Vibbert. View 1 comment. May 17, Michele rated it really liked it Shelves: history-paleo-bronze-age , history-classical-antiquity.

    But paleolithic cave paintings, stunning as they are, form just a part a story that begins with the arrival of the first humans to Europe 1. In Europe before Rome, T.

    Customer Reviews

    Douglas Price takes readers on a guided tour through dozens of the most important prehistoric sites on the continent, from very recent discoveries to some of the most famous and puzzling places in the world, like Chauvet, Stonehenge, and Knossos. This volume focuses on more than 60 sites, organized chronologically according to their archaeological time period and accompanied by illustrations, including color photographs, maps, and drawings.

    Many of the sites explored in the book offer the earliest European evidence we have of the typical features of human society--tool making, hunting, cooking, burial practices, agriculture, and warfare. Introductory prologues to each chapter provide context for the wider changes in human behavior and society in the time period, while the author's concluding remarks offer expert reflections on the enduring significance of these places.

    Many of the sites explored in the book offer the earliest European evidence we have of the typical features of human society--tool making, hunting, cooking, burial practices, agriculture, and warfare. Introductory prologues to each chapter provide context for the wider changes in human behavior and society in the time period, while the author's concluding remarks offer expert reflections on the enduring significance of these places. Tracing the evolution of human society in Europe across more than a million years, Europe before Rome gives readers a vivid portrait of life for prehistoric man and woman.

    Ancient Scandinavia T Douglas Price. Bloggat om Europe before Rome.